Family of Birds by Octavio Ocampo

Ambiguous 10 March 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

This painting from Mexican artist Octavio Ocampo effectively uses negative space to create two distinct images that occupy the same space.  Do you see a tree and several birds or do you see the face of a woman?  You cannot view them both at the same time, but you can very easily flip-flop between the two interpretations.

Family of Birds by Octavio Ocampo

For me personally, the first thing that I notice when viewing this painting is the woman’s face.  I have to focus on the tree on the left side of the painting in order to not see the her face.  Try using your hand to cover up the two birds at the bottom (representing the girl’s nose and mouth) and then all you will notice is the tree and bird at the top.

(via Visions Fine Art)

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Impossible Triangle on Fence

Impossible 7 March 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

The impossible triangle (also known as the Penrose triangle) has intrigued viewers (and artists) since it was first introduced by Oscar Reutersvärd in the 1930s.  In the photograph below, street artist Femoesa designed this version of the impossible triangle using a chain link fence.  This particular impossible work of art was created in 2013 in the Netherlands in a city named Delft.

Impossible Triangle in Fence

(via Femoesa)

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Frazzle by Kaia Nao

Motion 3 March 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

If you suffer from motion sickness, now might be a really good time to get out your Dramamine.  As your eyes move across this series of nine distorted circular objects, you may notice that they start to move or pulsate.  It almost looks as if the circles are made of wax and are somehow melting and becoming more distorted.

Frazzle by Kaia Nao

(via Kaia Nao)

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Mask of Love by Gianni Sarcone

Ambiguous 29 February 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

When viewing this Venetian mask for the first time, most people notice a single, slightly blurry face that appears to be wearing the mask.  What do you see?

Mask of Love

Upon closer inspection, you can also notice two different faces within the outline of the mask.  A woman (on the left) and a man (on the right) can be seen kissing one another.  Once the viewer sees these two individual faces within the space of the mask, their brain will “flip” between two possible interpretations of what lies inside of the mask (a single face or two people kissing).  This illusion was a finalist in the 2011 Best Illusion of the Year Contest hosted by the Neural Correlate Society.

(via Gianni Sarcone)

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Chess Pieces Lightness Illusion

Color 26 February 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Today’s illusion is from an article written by Barton L. Anderson and Jonathan Winawer and published in Nature (the international weekly journal of science).  Remarkably, the chess pieces on the top and bottom images are identical!  It may seem hard to believe, but it is true.

When surrounded by a dark color (like the top portion), the chess pieces appear as light objects.  When the background haze is changed to a light color (like the bottom portion), the chess pieces suddenly appear to be dark objects.

Chess Pieces

(via Nature)

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Cat House by Gene Levine

Stereo 22 February 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Gene Levine recently emailed a couple of new 3D stereograms that he has been working on.  Below is one of these images which he calls Cat House.  If you stare at this pattern, a hidden image will reveal itself.  Can you figure out what it is?

Cat House Stereogram by Gene Levine

If you need some help viewing stereograms, please review these Stereogram Viewing Tips.

(via eyeTricks 3D Stereograms)

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Anamorphic Waterfall by Alessandro Diddi

Anamorphosis 19 February 2016 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

In 1961, famous Dutch artist M.C. Escher printed a lithograph titled Waterfall.  This print shows a seemingly impossible scene with water flowing uphill to create a perpetual waterfall using the same water over and over again.  There is a paddle wheel at the bottom of the waterfall which we would assume is what powers the water back up the hill.  Many artists have created derivative works or art inspired by this very intriguing concept.

Here, Italian artist Alessandro Diddi has sketched a three-dimensional anamorphic version of the waterfall that appears to literally stand off the page.  In reality, it is all drawn on a perfectly flat sheet of paper.  He has cut some sections of the paper away to help add to this optical illusion.

Waterfall by Alessandro Diddi

(via Alessandro Diddi)

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