Anamorphic Skull

Anamorphosis, Skull 23 March 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Truly Design drew this entire anamorphic composition by hand, which means that they did not use any projectors to help with getting the distortion correct.  It was painted in 2013 at the 39C Graffiti Jam in Bolzano, Italy.  When viewed from the proper angle (see image below), an image of an orange skull can be seen.

The next two pictures show how the painting looks when viewed from different angles.  Seen from the front, you can see that the skull is comprised of three animals representing Dante’s “three beasts”.  Each of these animals represents one of humanity’s three main sins.  The wolf represents greed, the lion represents pride, and the lynx stands for lust.  It is said that these sins would lead man to perdition, hence death, making the skull symbolism fit very well with the overall illusion.

(via Truly Design)

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More Amazing Anamorphic Illusions

Anamorphosis, Video 18 March 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

The Youtube artist known as Brusspup has come up with some really good anamorphic optical illusion videos in the past.  Here are some additional anamorphic illusions that he created which will surely blow your mind.  You’ll see a red Solo cup that really isn’t there along.  Then you will witness some other really nice anamorphic illusions featuring a black digital camera, a Rubik’s cube reflected in a mirror, and ultimately an entire tabletop full of items.

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Self-Pouring Bottle on a Twisted Page

Impossible 3 March 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

The title pretty much explains today’s optical illusion, which is courtesy of Swiss artist Sandro Del-Prete.  Del-Prete is a master at drawing impossible scenes and this example is certainly no exception.  Shown below is a twisted sheet of paper with a cleverly-designed drawing of a bottle pouring its own glass of wine by itself.  The label on the bottle reads “Castel Nero D’Illusoria” and also happens to feature the illusion itself beneath the text.  Even if something like this were possible, the way that the paper is twisted would make it impossible.  But that’s what makes it so interesting to look at!

(via Sandro Del-Prete)

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Great Wall of China Optical Illusion

Forced Perspective 14 February 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

This gentleman is casually leaning up against a wall on a visit to the Great Wall of China.  But something doesn’t quite seem right about this photograph.  Can you figure out what is going on?

Parts of the Great Wall of China were built as early as the 7th century BC.   Most of the best-known sections of the Great Wall were built in the 14th through 17th centuries AD, during the Ming dynasty (which spanned from 1368 to 1644).  The best-known section of the Great Wall of China (located about 43 miles northwest of Beijing) was rebuilt in the late 1950s, and attracts thousands of tourists on a daily basis.

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Shiny Legs Optical Illusion

Ambiguous 7 February 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Take a good look at the the legs in this photograph.

Do they appear to be shiny to you, as if they are wet or have oil rubbed on them?  Would you believe that they are not oily at all?  Instead, they are just a normal pair of dry legs with streaks and spots of white paint on them.  Once you notice that the legs just have paint on them, the “shine” all of the sudden disappears.

This ambiguous optical illusion allows you to flip-flop back and forth from viewing the legs as shiny and viewing them as legs with white paint on them.

To see another optical illusion featuring legs, be sure to check out the Ambiguous Dancing Legs optical illusion.

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Duck Hunting by Valentine Dubinin

Upside Down 30 January 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Russian cartoonist Valentine Dubinin illustrated this unique portrait.  It depicts a duck hunter in the water getting ready to fire at a duck desperately attempting to flee the scene.  The hunter’s dog can be seen in the lower right-hand corner of the image, possibly ready to retrieve the duck if the hunter lands a successful shot.

When you turn this image upside down, an entirely different scene is presented.  The hunter with the gun transforms into an angry duck swooping down at the hunter’s dog swimming in the water (with a concerned look on his face).

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Moving Targets

Motion 20 January 2017 No Comments Yet - Share Your Thoughts

Stereogram designer Gene Levine was playing around with some different pattern designs the other night and came up with this one.  As he looked at the pattern on his monitor, he noticed that he could not get the “targets” to stop moving and that he had inadvertently created an optical illusion with apparent motion.   The small “targets” appear to be unstable and shift against the background when you stare at this image.

(via eyeTricks 3D Stereograms)

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